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Black Art Auction  Prepares for First Sales Event

Black Art Auction Prepares for First Sales Event

Above: Ed Clark, The China Series, acrylic on canvas.

Black art is more popular than ever, and we now have a new art auction house, Black Art Auction, showcasing some of the best African American artists in the nation that is slated to raise the hammer on May 16, 2020.

The art market may be down, but Black art is certainly selling. Plus, with the current financial situation that is overtaking the global financial landscape, an art auction is a great way to liquidate work by Black artists in your collection and put cash back in your bank account. 

Black Art Auction is a unique auction house that focuses on the African American art market. Their current catalog is incredibly diverse and still growing. Expect work by John Biggers, Ed Clark, Charles McGee, Hilda Wilkinson Brown and more. While they offer quite a lot, consignment opportunities are still available. 

Not only is this the right time for people who need to liquidate their art, it’s also a great time to add the masters to your art collection. Building an art collection is up to the discretion to the collector, but it is a great idea to diversify your collection. We currently see so many young promising Black artists doing well, but it’s really the invaluable classics from those who came before them that not only inspired their work, but also opened doors to get into galleries and museums, as well as educational doors that may not before had been open. Here are some of our favorites:

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"Art must be an integral part of the struggle. It can’t simply mirror what’s taking place. It must adapt itself to human needs. It must ally itself with the forces of liberation. The fact is, artists have always been propagandists. I have no use for artists who try to divorce themselves from the struggle.” -White, quoted in Jeffrey Elliot, “Charles White: Portrait of an Artist,” Negro History Bulletin 41, no. 3 (May–June 1978): 828. Love Letter III (1977) is one of a series of prints started as a tribute to Black Womanhood, the power of femininity and its connection to the divine. (Love Letter I is dedicated to Angela Davis during the time of her arrest and trial in LA during the early 1970s.) This image is a depiction of the black woman in a pose typically used in Christianity to depict the Virgin Mary and other female saints. Her face is upturned to the image of a conch shell, a sacred item in many cultures, representing the reverberation of truth over deception and a sign of victory over suffering. Combining the pale, salmony pink against a gradient blue background gives the image a balance of serenity and power, managing to be both calming and impactful all at once, a characteristic of all of White's work. This print and many more will be available in our inaugural auction on May 16th here in Indianapolis. Message here for questions and consignment requests. #blackart #blackartist #changethenarrative #blackhistory #blackimage #holymother #virginmother #conch #peach #blue #contrast #iconography #saints #womanhood

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Hughie Lee Smith, Rooftops, 1961, Oil on canvas, 24 x 34 inches, Signed. Hughie Lee Smith (1915 – 1999) was a painter based in the Midwest for the early portion of his career. He began his training while in high school at the Cleveland Museum of Art; at 20, he won a Scholastic Magazine scholarship that allowed him to study at Detroit Society of Art. Lee Smith’s work has been largely looked over in the art world because of its subtlety during the Cold War politics of the 1960’s. He worked within a movement called Magic Realism, that debuted in Germany 1920s, less interested in outright class rebellion and working with the ideas of the strangeness and incongruity of the contemporary moment. In the 1960s United States, Lee Smith worked within several conflicting forces: the uprise of the Civil Rights’ movement, the restriction of expression based on the Cold War politics and FBI monitoring systems put into place, the destruction of the steel industries that were the backbone of the Midwestern middle class. All of these forces can be seen within Smith’s work in their distance and isolation, their degradation of place, the racial ambiguity of his figures and in the muted color pallet across all of his works. Rooftops (1961) is one of his quintessential pieces and will be up for auction at our sale coming up on May 16. Message us for details. #blackart #magicrealism #hughieleesmith #painting #oilpainting #americanartist #changingthenarrative

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