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Black Cube Announces 2020 Artist Fellows

Black Cube, a nomadic contemporary art museum, welcomes four new artists into its Artist Fellowship program. Black Cube’s 2020 Artist Fellows include Lenka Clayton and Phillip Andrew Lewis (Pittsburgh, PA), Onyedika Chuke (New York City, NY), and Anna Uddenberg (Berlin, Germany).

Launched in 2015, Black Cube’s Artist Fellowship and founding program has received more than 21 visual artists. The fellowship guides exceptional contemporary artists through the production of an ambitious, new, site-specific artwork in the public realm. Additionally, the fellowship supports artists holistically with individualized career support and a critical space to experiment. In 2020, the museum will unfold projects by current fellows Adam Milner (New York City, NY) and Alejandro Almanza Pereda (Guadalajara, MX), as well as complete Anuar Maauad’s project, which is sited at 100 locations throughout the Denver Metro Area. Furthermore, Black Cube is excited to welcome its 2020 Artist Fellows.

Lenka Clayton and Phillip Andrew Lewis are Black Cube’s first named Artist Fellows under the Sabrina Merage Foundation. Part of Black Cube’s Artist Fellowship program, the Sabrina Merage Foundation Artist Fellowship is a 2020 fellowship for a contemporary artist, duo, or collective working at the intersection of inclusivity and diversity. This fellowship was created to support artists interested in cultivating relationships between new audiences and contemporary art. The two artists will be working collaboratively for their fellowship to create a site-specific artwork that embodies universal perspectives. Based out of Pittsburgh, PA, Clayton and Andrew Lewis have established practices that focus on working outside of the “white cube.”

With a practice that focuses on sculpture and text, New York City-based Nigerian artist Onyedika Chuke imagines his most recent work as a sculptural archive called The Forever Museum Archive, which he began in Libya in 2011. Berlin-based Swedish artist Anna Uddenberg’s work investigates how body culture, spirituality, and self-staging are intertwined with the mediation and production of subjectivity by new technologies and forms of circulation.